Yvonne Ocrant Authors Article Offering Tips for Lawyers Looking to Represent Equestrians

April 7, 2016

Yvonne C. Ocrant, a Chicago-based partner in the Equine Law practice of Hinshaw & Culbertson LLP, authored the article "Adding a Horse to a Sport Behooves New Legal Questions" published by the Chicago Daily Law Bulletin on March 29, 2016.

The article describes the Olympic sport of three-day eventing and the various legal needs that participants in it, and competitive equestrians generally, often have. She then offers tips to attorneys looking to represent equestrians specifically and competitive athletes more broadly.

Read the full article "Adding a Horse to a Sport Behooves New Legal Questions" on the Chicago Daily Law Bulletin website. Please note, a subscription is required. 

Ms. Ocrant practices in the areas of equine law, title insurance, employment law and commercial litigation. Her equine law experience includes handling litigation involving the Equine Activity Liability Act and various other state and federal laws. Ms. Ocrant assists individual horse owners; trainers; breeders; riding, boarding and training facilities; veterinarians and other entities in the equine industry litigate and resolve claims for personal injury, property damage, breach of contract, fraud, misrepresentation and other legal issues. She drafts contracts for horse purchases, sales, leases and commission arrangements, and creates equine liability releases for boarding and training facilities, trainers, transporters and other individuals and entities sponsoring or participating in equine activities.

Hinshaw & Culbertson LLP is a national law firm with approximately 500 attorneys providing coordinated legal services across the United States and in London. Hinshaw lawyers partner with businesses, governmental entities and individuals to help them effectively address legal challenges and seize opportunities. Founded in 1934, the firm represents clients in complex litigation and in regulatory and transactional matters.


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